“Fasting and Feasting 4”

1948-50s 207

“Fasting from isolation and feasting on interdependence”

It’s a hot summer day and my little brother is confined to a play pen so my mother doesn’t have keep an eye on him while she is in the house. Play pens were common in the 1950’s, so this was normal. Still my brother is unable to get his own drink. He is isolated, in a sense, behind wooden bars. I am older, free to run around, and able to pour my own Kool-Aid. Somehow I recognized his thirst and went over and shared the strawberry drink.

While we may often think about how to end our own isolation and connect with others, this photo reminds us to see those around us who are isolated. Many are behind bars, either literally in jail or figuratively being caught up in pain and distress. In that case, the isolated ones can’t reach out to us. We have to be the initiators of connection and demonstrate the value of interdependence.

May we be aware of those around us who are isolated by their circumstances and offer them at least a “cup of cold water.” Connection accompanies the water and is, after all, the more important part of the gesture.

 

14 thoughts on ““Fasting and Feasting 4”

  1. I agree with robbiesinspiration. A lot of siblings would never share their Kool-Aid! That may sound trite, but it says a lot about a child at that age.

  2. Children are natural born givers. They give because God gave them the gift of giving. It’s is refreshing to read your Lenten reflection. I am so glad you are not fasting from social media. What comes to mind are my neighbors. They tend to isolate themselves and become surprised when I start talking to them. It takes a lot of patience and gain their trust.

    1. We had a neighbor like that. We prayed for him for several years before he would interact at all. Then he shared a little of his childhood with my husband, and it all made sense.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s